I Want a Dog

screen-shot-2016-12-29-at-2-51-17-pmThis is another NFB adaptation of a book by Canadian/American author and illustrator Dayal Kaur Khalsa, with animation by Sheldon Cohen and music by Zander Ary, performed by Neko Case. It tells the story of young girl named May who comes up with an ingenious way to convince her parents to get her a dog. It’s a sweet story of overcoming obstacles with good-natured persistence. Though the story is really for kids age 4 or so and up, L., now 14 months, loves it too. “Doggie! Doggie! Doggie!”

Age: 4+
Child rating: 10/10
Adult rating: 9/10
Running time: 10 minutes
Available: for free here on the NFB website

 

The Snow Cat

screen-shot-2016-12-29-at-10-34-58-amThis wintery story is based on a book by Canadian/American author Dayal Kaur Khalsa, adapted by Tim Wynne-Jones and animated by Sheldon Cohen. A grandmother tells her young grand-daughter the tale of Elsie, who lives alone in a cabin near the woods, and longs for a companion. Elsie makes friends with a magical snow cat and an injured goose, and comes to find comfort and companionship in nature and the cyclical return of the seasons. This story can certainly be taken at face value, as a magical tale, but it is also about coming to terms with loss, change, and death – and indeed Khalsa wrote the book as she was coming to terms with her own diagnosis of breast cancer. (M., looking over my shoulder says “it’s sad because the cat melts,” but that it is nice when that cat returns as a cat-shaped pond.)

Age: 4+
Child rating: 9/10
Adult rating: 9/10
Running time: 23 minutes
Available: for free here on the NFB website

The Story of Christmas

Screen Shot 2015-11-25 at 10.05.52 PMThis is a bright and cheerful version of the Christmas story, with luminously painted zinc foil cutout animation against a black background by Evelyn Lambart. The story is told wordlessly with a celebratory renaissance-style soundtrack by Karl Duplessis.

Age: 1+
Adult rating: 9/10
Child Rating: 9/10
Running time: 8 minutes
Available free on the National Film Board of Canada website

Lights for Gita

BR Lights for GitaI’ve been looking for films about non-Christmas winter holidays, and this is the first I’ve found that I’ve wanted to show Milo. Based on a book by Indian-Canadian author Rachna Gilmore, this film tells the story of a young girl, Gita, who has recently moved from India to Canada. She is looking forward to celebrating Diwali with her new friends from school, and is disappointed when a snowstorm means that her dad won’t be able to set off fireworks, and her friends can’t get to her house. Gita, her family, and one friend who lives near by, figure out a way to celebrate and light up the darkness in her new wintery home.

I don’t love the animation or illustrations (I prefer the book illustrations), but they are fine. The score is by Normand Roger, whose work I always enjoy. Milo loved it, and wanted to watch several times in a row.

Age: 3+
Adult rating: 8/10
Child Rating: 9/10
Running time: 8 minutes
Available free on the National Film Board of Canada website

The Lion and the Mouse

BR The Lion and the MouseThis is a beautiful and sweet animated version of Aesop’s fable “The Lion and the Mouse,” by Canadian animator Evelyn Lambart (1914-1999). Lambart was initially best known for her collaborations with Norman MacLaren, but later in life developed her own unique and visually arresting style of animation using brightly coloured paper cutouts against a black background, which looks a bit like Russian folk painting. There is no verbal dialogue, but the soundtrack by Maurice Blackburn tells the story in a conversational, semi-improvisatory style. Some children might find the lion a little bit scary, but nothing bad happens, and the mouse and the lion become friends at the end.

(Do be careful if you decided to go on from here to “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse.” It starts out very gently, but the country mouse takes a gun when he goes to the city. M. doesn’t yet know about guns, so we stopped the video when we got to that point!)

Age: 3+
Adult rating: 9/10
Child Rating: 9/10
Running time: 4 minutes
Available free on the National Film Board of Canada website

The Boy and the Snow Goose

BR Boy and SNow GooseIn this gentle, slightly bittersweet story, a boy rescues an injured snow goose and nurses it back to health. The boy and goose have magic-filled summer together, but must say goodbye when the goose migrates with the other geese in the fall. The boy spends the winter dreaming of the goose, and is happily (though briefly) reunited with the goose when it returns in the spring.

The visuals are book illustration style, in muted colours, with simple, slow-paced animation. The soundtrack is by Normand Roger, whose music I always enjoy.

In one scene, a child briefly threatens to throw a stone at the goose. Though nothing bad happens, you may wish to postpone watching this film with your toddler until they are already aware that people sometimes do mean things like that. (Or you could use it as an opportunity to discuss that before they encounter it in real life.)

Age: 3+
Adult rating: 9/10
Child rating: 9/10
Running time: 10 minutes
Available free on the National Film Board of Canada website

Hen Hop

BR Hen HopThis is a sweet, short animation of a dancing chicken by Norman McLaren, from the early 1940s. The animation is drawn directly on to the film with pen and ink, and the musical accompaniment is an old-time string band.

Age: 1+
Child rating: 9/10
Adult rating: 9/10
Running time: 4 minutes
Available free on the National Film Board of Canada website